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Complementary and alternative medicine utilisation in NHS and private clinic settings: a United Kingdom survey of 400 infertility patients

WE RESTORING YOUR NATURAL LIFE. 


WE PAY A CONSIDERABLE ATTENTION TO ALL OUR PATIENT`S LIFE IS BASED ON THE PHILOSOPHY THAT PHYSICAL, MENTAL, EMOTIONAL CIRCUMSTANTIAL FACTORS CAN CONTRIBUTE TO HEALTH OR ILL-HEALTH. 


THE IMPORTANCE OF THE PATIENT THERAPIST RELATIONSHIP, FOCUSES ON THE WHOLE PERSON, IS INFORMED BY EVIDENCE AND INTEGRATES NATUROPATHIC HEALTHCARE AND DISCIPLINES, LIFESTYLE AND NUTRITIONAL ADVICE



National Health Statistic Reporte

Introduction

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) covers a heterogeneous spectrum of ancient to new-age approaches that purport to prevent or treat disease. By definition, CAM practices are not part of conventional medicine because there is insufficient proof that they are safe and effective. Complementary interventions are used together with conventional treatments, whereas alternative interventions are used instead of conventional medicine. Generally, persons who choose CAM approaches are seeking ways to improve their health and well-being or to relieve symptoms associated with chronic, even terminal, illnesses or the side effects of conventional treatments for them. Other reasons for choosing to use CAM include having a holistic health philosophy or a transformational experience that changes one’s world view and wanting greater control over one’s own health. Many types of CAM practitioners try to treat not only the physical and biochemical manifestations of illness, but also the nutritional, emotional, social, and spiritual context in which the illness arises. The overwhelming majority of patients using CAM approaches do so to complement conventional care rather than as an alternative to conventional care.

http://www.methodesurrender.org/docs/art_nhsr_2007.pdf

​http://www.biomedcentral.com/1743-1050/content/2/1/5

Abstract
Some evidence suggests that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has found increased utilisation among patients seeking infertility treatment, although there is little information available to quantify this phenomenon. This is important information as there is marketing for CAM directed to this group and professionals need to be aware of the treatments their patients are receiving. Patients attending for infertility diagnosis and treatment often ask the physician about CAM; this paper seeks to compare the prevalence of CAM use among infertility patients in National Health Service (NHS) and private clinics. This paper provides results of a survey of couples (n = 400) divided equally between NHS and private settings. Our data suggest a high use of CAM particularly among female private patients, although patients appear sceptical of the efficacy of such treatment which is consistent with the literature.

Introduction
Infertility patients are a vulnerable group that often seek a non-medical solution for their failure to conceive. The Cochrane Collaboration's definition of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is "a broad domain of healing resources that encompasses all health systems, modalities, and practices and their accompanying theories and beliefs other than those intrinsic to the politically dominant health systems of a particular society or culture in a given historical period". This survey sought to compare use of CAM by infertile couples in NHS and private settings.